Glad I have you: Leather Puncher

Hello lovely smiles,

Leather puncher in its packaging

Leather puncher in its packaging

About a month ago, as some of you might remember, I bought an AUD$1 belt at a sale about a month ago and they were way too big for me. I talked about getting a leather puncher so I can customise the belt to my size. Well, I’m telling you today I’m glad I decided to buy this little gadget! Now, I can surf the sales all I want and since my size is normally the one that is gone first (XS/S) and therefore found it hard to buy belts on crazy sales in the past. Now, I can buy larger belt sizes and will still be able to wear them!

If you are petite in build like me, then I definitely recommend this investment. I suggest buying the revolving one with multiple sized “punchers” (for lack of a better word – I don’t know what you’d call them) since different belts will require different sizes. Especially those fastened with a push button.

I researched DIY alternatives and they are very tedious, uncertain and the results are not satisfying at all! (messy, rough, etc) Trust me, $10 will be paid back in a flash! (e.g. I recently bought a supposedly $14 belt for $1 which was too big and I had to punch a few extra holes with my leather puncher at home. Now, I think by having the leather puncher, I saved $13 — BAM! Leather puncher paid back.)

Revolving leather puncher - multi-sized puncher

Revolving leather puncher – multi-sized puncher

A great tip if you are in AustraliaDO NOT buy this from Spotlight. I tried finding something like this there and it costs AUD$25+. I luckily went to Bunnings (a home-improvement/hardware store) shortly after and found this one that I bought for a little less than AUD$10.

Leather puncher packaging

Leather puncher packaging

I also searched online and found nothing worthy of buying less than $8. And that didn’t include shipping either. The wait times for delivery and such were around 1 month. Totally would have costed me more than $10.

hole comparisons

Holes originally on the belt vs holes I made using the Leather Puncher

UPDATED: here is the hole comparisons – original holes vs punched holes. In my opinion the holes are really neat and you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference unless you stare at them really well. With my black belt, I had to make the hole bigger since I didn’t want to even attempt to make the slits.

If you would like to use this, then make sure you start from a hole that is a little smaller in size than what you think it might be. If you made a mistake in judging, you can always go bigger, but not smaller.

So that is all smileys, I hope you found this useful!

Lots of Smiles,

Sita

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For The Love of Giant Panda [DIY T-Shirt & Mix Apparel Haul]

So about a month ago I saw a post by Crissey from HelloCrissey on Tumblr on how she did a DIY Panda Face Sweater. I’ve always loved the Giant Panda and frankly I’m always drawn to tops that has a panda face on it. Not to mention, the official mascot of the residential college I attended is a Giant Panda. So I decided to take the techniques and templates from Crissey’s tutorial and made my own Panda T-Shirt.

The Haul

Since mum already had the needle and thread, all I needed was the t-shirt.

I went to search for a good, comfortable plain white t-shirt that are super affordable (I never like to spend money on overpriced stuff). I tried looking at many places both online and offline stores. In the end, I unexpectedly found some at Coles by Mix Apparel. I picked up 2 T-Shirts from the clearance section – one more fitting and the other loose fitting. Though the colour is a little more like cream than it is white, I thought this would make the tee looks less “harsh” and give it a “lived in” look which I love.

The bag the Mix Apparel T-Shirts were packaged in at the check out

Fitted V-Neck Mix Apparel T-Shirt in XS
($4)

Loose-fit Round-Neck Mix Apparel T-Shirt in S
($5)

The End Product

My DIY Panda Face T-Shirt

Embroidery Hoop

I pretty much followed exactly how Crissey did it in her blog post (and used her template too – which printed to about half an A4 size) but I thought that I didn’t like how hers looked “bunched up” – like she pulled on the needle too hard while sewing. To solve this problem, I concentrated in stitching with very little “pull” and also used an embroidery hoop I had laying around.

I also used “long and short stitch” to fill in rather than “satin stitch” as suggested by my mother to give it a more “natural” look at the end. Click HERE for a few basic stitches and to see the difference between the two stitches. They ARE quite similar to each other.

I used in total one embroidery floss plus a little bit more (maybe another 30cm), loading the needle with 2 out of the 6 strands of the floss at a time.

Embroidery Floss

In the end, because the T-Shirt material is so soft and stretchy (and super comfortable!) the stitching still looked like they were too tight. Luckily, I have a super-mum and she told me a very awesome trick!

TIP: Iron the embroidery afterwards from the back side (so turn the t-shirt inside out) to lessen the “pulled” look.

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The project took me 2 days to complete – with breaks. I did this while watching TV-Shows/Movies/YouTube clips on my desk.

Though I could have filled in more of the black, I think in the end I pretty much succeded this DIY and I can’t wait to start my next DIY Project!

Don’t forget to follow Sprinkle O’Rainbow for more posts!

Lots of Smiles,

Sita